Winter Reading for 2012

I have neither fireplace nor fire to read by, so I make due with fluorescent lighting and a room heater. Needless to say it is cold and time for my non-fiction reading in the new year. 

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I adore books made in the 1930’s when industry was at it maxim, coal fired plants turned out tome after tome. The writing is quintessential of that era, clear, detailed, and concise. But it gets to the heart and soul of the subject matter.

During the Great Depression in America there was a Federally funded writers (and other professions) traveling the states and writing really amazing pieces. The WPA created this state guide series gathering the history, culture, and scenery of each state. Several great writers started their careers writing for this government program. 

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Not only invaluable words and information, but incredible era imagery can be found in the original 1938 editions.

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This one on California was printed after the war and is immense. The photography is really superb stuff, and incredibly valuable for people wanting inspiration.

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Small text and wonderful photos.

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This book was unforgettable. Wade Davis gives an incredible narrative about his work and others of ancient people. It’s about how people learned from their environments, and not only how they respected nature and its rules, but how to live and flourish in it. The Wayfinders, or how to people found a way to exist and persist in their environment. We all can learn from these basic yet incredibly deep principles. Thanks to Ragged Glory for the recommendation.

 

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My favorite Seth Godin book, and a collection of ideas of how great it is that we are all different. I greatly recommend this book to anyone who wants to embrace their own brand of weirdness and be successful with it. We Are All Weird

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One of the books that I use to study textiles from time to time. An indispensable reference book and photo collection on rural Japan. Well researched and written. So many great ideas in one book!

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