Wayo-ism

Wayousechu is a topic I have touched on before. I have witnessed this style increasing in scattered posts across the internet. John Mayer may possibly the most well-known for it, in a recent GQ article the writer points out John’s love of the noragi. It isn’t really a noragi…  but let that slide. What is important, is silhouette, collar, unfitted sleeves and the simple structure of the garment. These details I will coin as “wayo-ism”, and the next iteration of east-meets-west style…

John isn’t the only one to be on a bender of east and west. The sheer number of people wearing indigo sashiko kendo-gi lately is astounding. I am not sure if it is for function (comfort) or for just the general fad in denim fashion. Everywhere you look these days Kapital, Visvim, Old Park, etc there is a strong presence of some type of traditional Japanese garment influence.

Kapital has really done some nice knit pieces this year utilizing this “noragi” style. Kapital calls them “kesa” which is more like a Buddhist monks sash but again it is just a naming thing. Not important.

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What is important is how comfortable and just how easy these pieces are to style with. Since the structure is relatively simple and the fabric which is a wool knit in this case; it is easy to pair with patterns and many layers. The tsugihagi version is more eye-catching and complicated. The sakiami is really beautiful, and I really love the texture of this piece. Sakiami is basically rag knitting.

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The real big deal for Kapital this year is this incredibly huge shirt. Called a “Sloppy Shirt Coat” meant to be worn big (of course) and loose and deeply layered in colder weather as a top layer. I am continuing my haramaki obsession from last year as it pairs well. I think it could be styled well with a men’s obi or a cool piece of braided fabric (obijime possibly would look good). There are a few different fabric options and two sizes available. It is very comfy and it is exactly what you would want if you want to feel like “Six Foot Baby“. Again Mr. John Mayer enjoying the wide world of wayo-ism…

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Last but not least is this new for 2017, Tezomeya china-button-loop-wheel-cotton shirt. This one is my personal design and limited to 10 pieces. Fortunately you can have it dyed any color Tezomeya produces. It comes in only one size but it will fit up to a size 44 chest. The sleeves can be shortened. If interested please send an inquiry through the contact link on the Tezomeya homepage.

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Brown Tabby Works X The Bandanna Almanac

I have been gathering worn out, and faded items over the past few years. Narita-san and I have teamed up to bring these items back to life with a more shibui feel to them. Through detailed repairs we bring out the faded beauty of each item, their individual stories become apparent by keeping the stains and scars. We also add some more function to them by stitching pockets and altering the length of some items. All items and future items are/will be available on my new Etsy site. Kishoten…, means: introduction, development, turn… and the conclusion is up to each customer. From the Japanese 起承転結.

The first item we have completed is this noragi. I wanted to keep the original repairs and fabric on this piece, so we shortened the length and added pockets to the font side. The addition of a blanket pin acts as a closure, to keep the rustic theme.

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The second item is this Red Cross Army vest. The worsted wool in Army green has a mother-made feel to it. Probably because these were hand-knit by housewives and volunteers during the two world wars. This one had several holes in it. So we used some old sock yarn and hand-darned each hold. This adds a little colorful contrast to the otherwise mute khaki green.

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The third is my personal favorite. I found a Harley Davidson dude’s Lee Storm Rider. There was a lot of wear and damage to the entire piece that made it very unique. We cut out the back panel and put in a repurposed Chimayo fabric from a Kapital vest. The holes we are all patched with indigo thread. The collar features a nice contrast green corduroy patch, and the blanket lining inside was patched with fabric from a Warner Brothers Costume Department tunic.

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